City Looking for Assistance to Recover Heritage Art Pieces

The City of Kenora is asking for the public’s assistance in recovering the heritage art pieces that were once displayed on the Norman Bay Bridge.

When the Norman Bay Bridge was constructed in 1948, there were Indigenous figures made from metal rods posted on the stone pillars at each entrance. When the bridge underwent reconstruction, the four figures were taken down and put into storage. Since then, the heritage artworks have gone missing without a trace of their whereabouts. The last two pieces disappeared in September 2016. These artworks have significant importance to our heritage and our reconciliation with our Indigenous community.

In an effort to find the heritage pieces, the City of Kenora is declaring November as amnesty month for the anonymous return of the metal art pieces. The art pieces may be dropped off at the City of Kenora Operations Building, 60 Fourteenth Street North front entrance; no questions asked.

“We hope someone will do the right thing, and return the artwork to the City without worry about prosecution or penalty,” says Mayor Dave Canfield. If the pieces are returned, the City would like to see a permanent display of the Indigenous figures to honour their significance to the community and our Treaty 3 partners.

Norman Bay Bridge Image

Norman Bay Bridge Indigenous Figure Heritage Artwork

Norman Bay Bridge Aerial Photo

Norman Bay Bridge Aerial View

Photos courtesy of the Lake of the Woods Museum